Home & Garden

Thirteen Inspiring Ideas For Your Garden Shed

By How To

16/05/2016


1) A Shed Full of Curious Things
i)  Make your walls from plain lapped boards on a timber frame. 
ii)  Lag the inside with Rockwool and plywood to keep in the heat and stop the interior from getting too hot in the summer. 
iii) Roofing felt discharging into PVC guttering can serve as the roof, with unusual containers acting as water collectors. 
iv)  Make the shed door out of vertical boards on a simple frame. Hooks and screws on the back of the door can serve to hang tools and other objects.  

2) A Development Shed 
i)  Make your structure out of a sturdy timber frame and use concrete as the floor. 
ii)  The outside can either be clad in feather-edge board, or if you’re after something more durable and strong, use shiplap. 
iii)  Use tanalised timbers which are treated with feather-edge boards, as these can act as your walls. 
iv)  Corrugated PVC sheets, nailed to timber rafters, can make a roof.  

3) La Cabane 
i)  Use a concrete insulated slab as your flooring. 
ii)  Feather-edge boards which are treated with tanalising solution to keep out the weather can act as walls. 
iii)  Line the inside with insulation and MDF.  

4) HMS Summerhouse 
i)  Construct a metal frame clad with cheap boards. Despite not having any insulation, the wood is naturally warm. 
ii)  Cover the roof with 8x4ft plywood boards and fix with roofing felt. 
iii)  Build a stable door with a porthole for your door.  

5) The Construction
i)   Make your walls from plastic sheets - the surface of an old roller skating rink will do. If you think the plastic will act as an eyesore, decorate with flowers. 
ii) Second-hand pine timbers can be used as the frame and doors from the  same plastic as the walls. The translucent walls will act as the sunlight.  

6) Donatello Shed  
i) Shiplap boards work well as the outer skin of this type of shed.  
ii) All timbers should be treated with preservative stain.  
iii) Use roofing felt for the roof, which will discharge rainwater into PVC guttering.  
iv) Timber acts as a stable door.   

7) Potting Shed  
i) Externally treat the walls with shiplap boards. 
ii) Internal walls are lined with plywood and extensive insulation should run throughout. 
iii) Use a double pitch covered in roofing felt for the roof. 
iv) If you want access to the shed, double partially glazed doors work well.  

8) Old Garden Shed 
i) Line the walls with brick, which are built in with lime mortar. 
ii) Use a single pitch for the roof, cover with clay tiles and hang with pegs over battens fixed to the rafters. iii) A plank door works as a simple, but effective addition.  

9) The White Shed 
i) Double felt for the roof can be held down along the edges by roofing battens. 
ii) Stop any holes in the front door with some surplus roofing felt, a batten and a few clout nails.  

10) Sewing Shed 
i) Panel with oil-tempered hardboard and line with insulation. 
ii) Build on a concrete base with a shiplap boards acting as the frame. 
iii) A single pitch of roofing felt will collect the rainwater for the garden.  

11) Chapel of Ease  
i) Source some second-hand timber and use as a frame – the roof can have this exact same construction too.  
ii) Clad the walls in galvanized, corrugated iron.  

12) Verandah shed 
i)  Clad half the shed in old plywood and the other half in shiplap boards. The roof can also be made in the same way. 
ii)  Make the frame using old joists and insulate with Rockwool. 
iii)  Make the floor using sections of old Portakabin, which sit on heavy beams.  

13) Chainsaw Shed 
i) Make the walls from pine and the outside of lapped boards. 
ii) The roofing construction is of A-trusses with T&G boards fixed to the latter. The outside covering is usual felt. 

For more great ideas on sheds, read: My Shed and How it was Built: 50 Inspiring Sheds and Their Owners (Robinson) by Donato Cinicolo.